World Evangelism 101: Whatever It Takes, Acts 9.1-30

by Dr. Franklin L. Kirksey, pastor
FBC, Spanish Fort, Ala.

Introduction

Whatever it takes is the heart attitude of one who genuinely desires salvation.  Listen to the testimony of Paul recorded in 1 Timothy 1:12-17, “And I thank Christ Jesus our Lord who has enabled me, because He counted me faithful, putting me into the ministry,although I was formerly a blasphemer, a persecutor, and an insolent man; but I obtained mercy because I did it ignorantly in unbelief.  And the grace of our Lord was exceedingly abundant, with faith and love which are in Christ Jesus.  This is a faithful saying and worthy of all acceptance, that Christ Jesus came into the world to save sinners, of whom I am chief.  However, for this reason I obtained mercy, that in me first Jesus Christ might show all longsuffering, as a pattern to those who are going to believe on Him for everlasting life.  Now to the King eternal, immortal, invisible, to God who alone is wise, be honor and glory forever and ever.  Amen.”

Paul’s conversion is “a pattern.”  Someone explains, “The Greek word [translated pattern] conveys the thought of ‘a pencil sketch which an artist will draw before he settles down to produce his masterpiece, or a first proof’ which a printer will produce before he prints in quantity.  Thus we see that Paul’s conversion was a specimen, a sample, of what God accomplishes in the lives of all who are saved by His grace, and therefore all conversions are in a high degree similar to his conversion.”

The conversion of Saul of Tarsus is another notable conversion of the descendants of Noah.  Saul of Tarsus is a descendant of Shem.  Saul who became Paul shares, “For we are the circumcision, who worship God in the Spirit, rejoice in Christ Jesus, and have no confidence in the flesh, though I also might have confidence in the flesh.  If anyone else thinks he may have confidence in the flesh, I more so: circumcised the eighth day, of the stock of Israel, of the tribe of Benjamin, a Hebrew of the Hebrews; concerning the law, a Pharisee; concerning zeal, persecuting the church; concerning the righteousness which is in the law, blameless” (Philippians 3:3-6).

Allow me to share three movements in this pattern conversion of Saul of Tarsus.   

I. First, note his animosity for Christ’s church.

From Acts 9:1-2 we read, “Then Saul, still breathing threats and murder against the disciples of the Lord, went to the high priest  and asked letters from him to the synagogues of Damascus, so that if he found any who were of the Way, whether men or women, he might bring them bound to Jerusalem.”

In Acts 7:57, 58 we read, “Then they cried out with a loud voice, stopped their ears, and ran at him with one accord; and they cast him out of the city and stoned him.  And the witnesses laid down their clothes at the feet of a young man named Saul.”

Paul recounts in Acts 22:1-5, “‘Brethren and fathers, hear my defense before you now.’  And when they heard that he spoke to them in the Hebrew language, they kept all the more silent.  Then he said: ‘I am indeed a Jew, born in Tarsus of Cilicia, but brought up in this city at the feet of Gamaliel, taught according to the strictness of our fathers’ law, and was zealous toward God as you all are today.  I persecuted this Way to the death, binding and delivering into prisons both men and women,  as also the high priest bears me witness, and all the council of the elders, from whom I also received letters to the brethren, and went to Damascus to bring in chains even those who were there to Jerusalem to be punished.”

If you hate what Christ loves; watch out.  He will ultimately deliver His own from all animosity.  While the Jews are God’s chosen people, note the church is referred to in 1 Peter 2:4-10, “Coming to Him as to a living stone, rejected indeed by men, but chosen by God and precious, you also, as living stones, are being built up a spiritual house, a holy priesthood, to offer up spiritual sacrifices acceptable to God through Jesus Christ.  Therefore it is also contained in the Scripture, ‘Behold, I lay in Zion A chief cornerstone, elect, precious, And he who believes on Him will by no means be put to shame.’  Therefore, to you who believe, He is precious; but to those who are disobedient, ‘The stone which the builders rejected Has become the chief cornerstone,’ and ‘A stone of stumbling And a rock of offense.’  They stumble, being disobedient to the word, to which they also were appointed.  But you are a chosen generation, a royal priesthood, a holy nation, His own special people, that you may proclaim the praises of Him who called you out of darkness into His marvelous light; who once were not a people but are now the people of God, who had not obtained mercy but now have obtained mercy.”

We read the following about Christ and the church, “Wives, submit to your own husbands, as to the Lord.  For the husband is head of the wife, as also Christ is head of the church; and He is the Savior of the body.  Therefore, just as the church is subject to Christ, so let the wives be to their own husbands in everything.  Husbands, love your wives, just as Christ also loved the church and gave Himself for her,  that He might sanctify and cleanse her with the washing of water by the word,  that He might present her to Himself a glorious church, not having spot or wrinkle or any such thing, but that she should be holy and without blemish.  So husbands ought to love their own wives as their own bodies; he who loves his wife loves himself.  For no one ever hated his own flesh, but nourishes and cherishes it, just as the Lord does the church.  For we are members of His body, of His flesh and of His bones.  ‘For this reason a man shall leave his father and mother and be joined to his wife, and the two shall become one flesh.’  This is a great mystery, but I speak concerning Christ and the church.  Nevertheless let each one of you in particular so love his own wife as himself, and let the wife see that she respects her husband” (Ephesians 5:22-33).

Demonstrating the purpose and power of the Word of God, we read in Romans 7:7, “What shall we say then?  Is the law sin?  Certainly not!  On the contrary, I would not have known sin except through the law.  For I would not have known covetousness unless the law had said, ‘You shall not covet.’”

II. Second, note his agreement with Christ’s choice.

Dr. Luke writes in Acts 9:3-19, “As he journeyed he came near Damascus, and suddenly a light shone around him from heaven.  Then he fell to the ground, and heard a voice saying to him, ‘Saul, Saul, why are you persecuting Me?’  And he said, ‘Who are You, Lord?’  Then the Lord said, ‘I am Jesus, whom you are persecuting.  It is hard for you to kick against the goads.’  So he, trembling and astonished, said, ‘Lord, what do You want me to do?’  Then the Lord said to him, ‘Arise and go into the city, and you will be told what you must do.’  And the men who journeyed with him stood speechless, hearing a voice but seeing no one.  Then Saul arose from the ground, and when his eyes were opened he saw no one.  But they led him by the hand and brought him into Damascus.  And he was three days without sight, and neither ate nor drank.  Now there was a certain disciple at Damascus named Ananias; and to him the Lord said in a vision, ‘Ananias.’  And he said, ‘Here I am, Lord.’  So the Lord said to him, ‘Arise and go to the street called Straight, and inquire at the house of Judas for one called Saul of Tarsus, for behold, he is praying.  And in a vision he has seen a man named Ananias coming in and putting his hand on him, so that he might receive his sight.’  Then Ananias answered, ‘Lord, I have heard from many about this man, how much harm he has done to Your saints in Jerusalem.  And here he has authority from the chief priests to bind all who call on Your name.’  But the Lord said to him, ‘Go, for he is a chosen vessel of Mine to bear My name before Gentiles, kings, and the children of Israel.  For I will show him how many things he must suffer for My name’s sake.’  And Ananias went his way and entered the house; and laying his hands on him he said, ‘Brother Saul, the Lord Jesus, who appeared to you on the road as you came, has sent me that you may receive your sight and be filled with the Holy Spirit.’  Immediately there fell from his eyes something like scales, and he received his sight at once; and he arose and was baptized.  So when he had received food, he was strengthened.  Then Saul spent some days with the disciples at Damascus.”

We read in Acts 22:6-21, “Now it happened, as I journeyed and came near Damascus at about noon, suddenly a great light from heaven shone around me.  And I fell to the ground and heard a voice saying to me, ‘Saul, Saul, why are you persecuting Me?’  So I answered, ‘Who are You, Lord?’  And He said to me, ‘I am Jesus of Nazareth, whom you are persecuting.’  ‘And those who were with me indeed saw the light and were afraid, but they did not hear the voice of Him who spoke to me.  So I said, ‘What shall I do, Lord?’  And the Lord said to me, ‘Arise and go into Damascus, and there you will be told all things which are appointed for you to do.’  And since I could not see for the glory of that light, being led by the hand of those who were with me, I came into Damascus.  ‘Then a certain Ananias, a devout man according to the law, having a good testimony with all the Jews who dwelt there, came to me; and he stood and said to me, ‘Brother Saul, receive your sight.’  And at that same hour I looked up at him.  Then he said, ‘The God of our fathers has chosen you that you should know His will, and see the Just One, and hear the voice of His mouth.  For you will be His witness to all men of what you have seen and heard.  And now why are you waiting?  Arise and be baptized, and wash away your sins, calling on the name of the Lord.’  ‘Now it happened, when I returned to Jerusalem and was praying in the temple, that I was in a trance and saw Him saying to me, ‘Make haste and get out of Jerusalem quickly, for they will not receive your testimony concerning Me.’ So I said, ‘Lord, they know that in every synagogue I imprisoned and beat those who believe on You.  And when the blood of Your martyr Stephen was shed, I also was standing by consenting to his death, and guarding the clothes of those who were killing him.’  Then He said to me, ‘Depart, for I will send you far from here to the Gentiles.’

We read in Acts 26:12-18, “While thus occupied, as I journeyed to Damascus with authority and commission from the chief priests, at midday, O king, along the road I saw a light from heaven, brighter than the sun, shining around me and those who journeyed with me.  And when we all had fallen to the ground, I heard a voice speaking to me and saying in the Hebrew language, ‘Saul, Saul, why are you persecuting Me?  It is hard for you to kick against the goads.’  So I said, ‘Who are You, Lord?’  And He said, ‘I am Jesus, whom you are persecuting.  But rise and stand on your feet; for I have appeared to you for this purpose, to make you a minister and a witness both of the things which you have seen and of the things which I will yet reveal to you.  I will deliver you from the Jewish people, as well as from the Gentiles, to whom I now send you,  to open their eyes, in order to turn them from darkness to light, and from the power of Satan to God, that they may receive forgiveness of sins and an inheritance among those who are sanctified by faith in Me.’”

We read in 1 John 4:19, “We love Him because He first loved us.”  Jesus said in John 6:44a, “No one can come to Me unless the Father who sent Me draws him. . .”

Dr. George W. Sweeting, former president of Moody Bible Institute in Chicago, Illinois, explains, “Christ’s call was uncompromising and unconventional.  His words were so piercing that the hearers tried to kill Him.  Too often the Lord of glory is presented as meek and mild rather than high and holy, soft and sentimental instead of steadfast and strong.  Artists and poets have portrayed Christ with flowing chestnut hair, a feminine face, going about breathing mild benedictions upon everyone.  This is false!  It is true that He went about doing good, but He was firm and His words stringent.  He offended His disciples, His relatives, the scribes and Pharisees. . . .  The Christian life is not easy.  Jesus never gained disciples under false pretense.”[1]

III. Third, note his acceptance of Christ’s challenge.

In Acts 9:20-30 we read, “Immediately he preached the Christ in the synagogues, that He is the Son of God.  Then all who heard were amazed, and said, ‘Is this not he who destroyed those who called on this name in Jerusalem, and has come here for that purpose, so that he might bring them bound to the chief priests?’  But Saul increased all the more in strength, and confounded the Jews who dwelt in Damascus, proving that this Jesus is the Christ.  Now after many days were past, the Jews plotted to kill him.  But their plot became known to Saul.  And they watched the gates day and night, to kill him.  Then the disciples took him by night and let him down through the wall in a large basket.  And when Saul had come to Jerusalem, he tried to join the disciples; but they were all afraid of him, and did not believe that he was a disciple.  But Barnabas took him and brought him to the apostles.  And he declared to them how he had seen the Lord on the road, and that He had spoken to him, and how he had preached boldly at Damascus in the name of Jesus.  So he was with them at Jerusalem, coming in and going out.  And he spoke boldly in the name of the Lord Jesus and disputed against the Hellenists, but they attempted to kill him.  When the brethren found out, they brought him down to Caesarea and sent him out to Tarsus.”

We read in Acts 22:22-29, “And they listened to him until this word, and then they raised their voices and said, “Away with such a fellow from the earth, for he is not fit to live!’  Then, as they cried out and tore off their clothes and threw dust into the air, the commander ordered him to be brought into the barracks, and said that he should be examined under scourging, so that he might know why they shouted so against him.  And as they bound him with thongs, Paul said to the centurion who stood by, ‘Is it lawful for you to scourge a man who is a Roman, and uncondemned?’  When the centurion heard that, he went and told the commander, saying, ‘Take care what you do, for this man is a Roman.’  Then the commander came and said to him, ‘Tell me, are you a Roman?’  He said, ‘Yes.’  The commander answered, ‘With a large sum I obtained this citizenship.’  And Paul said, ‘But I was born a citizen.’  Then immediately those who were about to examine him withdrew from him; and the commander was also afraid after he found out that he was a Roman, and because he had bound him.”

We read in Acts 26:19-23, “Therefore, King Agrippa, I was not disobedient to the heavenly vision, but declared first to those in Damascus and in Jerusalem, and throughout all the region of Judea, and then to the Gentiles, that they should repent, turn to God, and do works befitting repentance.  For these reasons the Jews seized me in the temple and tried to kill me.  Therefore, having obtained help from God, to this day I stand, witnessing both to small and great, saying no other things than those which the prophets and Moses said would come—  that the Christ would suffer, that He would be the first to rise from the dead, and would proclaim light to the Jewish people and to the Gentiles.”

In Matthew 28:18-20 we find our Lord’s Great Commission, “And Jesus came and spoke to them, saying, ‘All authority has been given to Me in heaven and on earth.  Go therefore and make disciples of all the nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit,  teaching them to observe all things that I have commanded you; and lo, I am with you always, even to the end of the age.’  Amen.”

We read about the scope of the Great Commission in Acts 1:8, “But you shall receive power when the Holy Spirit has come upon you; and you shall be witnesses to Me in Jerusalem, and in all Judea and Samaria, and to the end of the earth.”

Conclusion

Dr. Vance Havner (1901-1986) explains, “In World War I Theodore Roosevelt blasted German-Americans who had divided loyalties.  He called them ‘hyphenated Americans’ and said, ‘America is not a polyglot boarding house.’  Moderatists would make the church a polyglot boarding house, filled with hyphenated Christians.  Roosevelt said, ‘If a man is an American and something else, he is not an American.’  That could be said of a Christian.  Billy Sunday used to say of worldly Christians, ‘You might as well talk about a heavenly devil.’  James tells us that the friend of the world is the enemy of God.  Our Lord said, ‘He that is not with me is against me; and he that gathereth not with me scattereth abroad’ (Matthew 12:30).  A man who is faithful to his wife part of the time is not faithful at all.  A man who is partly faithful to his family or his country or his church is a traitor.  A divided loyalty is not loyalty at all.  With Jesus Christ it is ‘all or nothing.’  Moderatism would split devotion and be both moderately righteous and moderately evil.”[2]

Paul the Apostle confessed, “But what things were gain to me, these I have counted loss for Christ.  Yet indeed I also count all things loss for the excellence of the knowledge of Christ Jesus my Lord, for whom I have suffered the loss of all things, and count them as rubbish, that I may gain Christ  and be found in Him, not having my own righteousness, which is from the law, but that which is through faith in Christ, the righteousness which is from God by faith;  that I may know Him and the power of His resurrection, and the fellowship of His sufferings, being conformed to His death,  if, by any means, I may attain to the resurrection from the dead.   Not that I have already attained, or am already perfected; but I press on, that I may lay hold of that for which Christ Jesus has also laid hold of me.  Brethren, I do not count myself to have apprehended; but one thing I do, forgetting those things which are behind and reaching forward to those things which are ahead, I press toward the goal for the prize of the upward call of God in Christ Jesus.  Therefore let us, as many as are mature, have this mind; and if in anything you think otherwise, God will reveal even this to you.  Nevertheless, to the degree that we have already attained, let us walk by the same rule, let us be of the same mind” (Philippians 3:7-16).

Dr. John R. W. Stott (1921-2011) has a paragraph on repentance in which he says, “Repentance is a definite turning from every thought, word, deed, and habit which is known to be wrong.  It is not sufficient to feel pangs of remorse or to make some kind of apology to God.  Fundamentally, repentance is a matter neither of emotion nor speech.  It is an inward change of mind and attitude towards sin which leads to a change in behavior.”[3]

Many erroneously think they can be Christians on their on terms.  While we are clearly saved by grace through faith and that not of ourselves, salvation is all of me responding to all of Him, with a heart attitude that says, “Whatever it takes.” 


[1]George W. Sweeting, “Talking It Over,” Sermon Notes, (Acts 9:6)

[2]Vance Havner, Why Not Just Be Christians?  “The Menace of Moderatism, Ch. 7, (New York: Fleming H. Revell Company, 1964), 46, Database © 2009 WORDsearch Corp.

[3]Paul S. Rees, Men of Action in the Book of Acts, (Westwood, NJ: Fleming H. Revell Company, 1966), 87

Dr. Franklin L. Kirksey is author of Sound Biblical Preaching: Giving the Bible a Voice Available on Amazon.com and WORDsearchbible.com

http://www.amazon.com/Sound-Biblical-Preaching-Giving-Bible/dp/1594577684

http://www.wordsearchbible.com/products/Sound_Biblical_Preaching_1476.html

http://www.webspawner.com/users/franklinlkirksey

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