Why David Platt ought not be IMB president | Bart Barber

August 26, 2014

by Bart Barber, pastor
FBC Farmersville, Texas

I hope you’ll recall that I have, in general, tried to be a voice of reasoned, calm moderation in the midst of previous administrative transitions in the SBC. When so many of my friends were vocally opposed to the election of Dr. Jason Allen at MWBTS, for example, I wrote this to ask them to take a deep breath and calm down (and I’ve got to say, I’m pretty pleased with his performance so far). Those of you who know me well have come to conclude, I hope, that I am not unreasonably reactionary.

Nevertheless, having received confirmation from multiple independent sources across the country that David Platt is the IMB Search Committee’s choice to receive the presidency of the International Mission Board, I cannot help but express my opinion that the trustees must not elect him to serve in this position. I offer the following reasons, pretty much in descending order of their importance to me.

First, his election is a disastrous blow to the Cooperative Program. His church makes no Annual Church Profile report, and the strongest endorsement of the Cooperative Program he was able to make when asked was, “I’m still wrestling through how [the Cooperative Program] looks in the context of [the church I pastor].” Wrestling. In other words, he affirmed the Cooperative Program with his words even though he didn’t lead his church to support the Cooperative Program financially. It isn’t because they are so embarrassed about how high their CP support is that Brook Hills is refusing to complete Annual Church Profiles. The Southern Baptist Convention is full of pastors, missionaries, and laypeople who don’t have to wrestle with it at all. We know how the CP looks in our churches. We give money through it and change the world for the gospel.

I’ve got to say, generally I’m the guy who is uncomfortable with all of us picking on each other about our varying levels of CP support. Churches are autonomous. They make their own decisions. Especially I find it distasteful for denominational employees to dare to criticize churches for what they give or don’t give. We ought to be thankful for every dollar.

But the calculus of all of that changes a little, I think, when you’re asking to be considered for the position of heading up the agency that receives over half of the national CP allocation. At that point, I think it becomes relevant whether you’ve been a CP visionary who has given actual leadership to strengthen the CP or whether you’re somebody who didn’t consider strengthening the CP to be worthy of your time and effort. The latter category reflects a group of people who are too lacking in vision and leadership to be promoted to such a position as the helm of the IMB.

David Platt simply has not given leadership with regard to the CP—neither to contribute to it effectively nor to fix whatever he thinks is broken that might prevent him from having confidence in the CP. I’m not saying that he could not; I’m simply observing that he has not. If he wants to go about doing so between now and whenever the next guy at the IMB retires, I’d be happy to consider him among the other qualified candidates at that time.

Look, friends, the Cooperative Program is not dead yet, and it will only die if you and I sit by and watch it die. If those setting the vision for the future of the SBC are a collection of people who really don’t care very much about the Cooperative Program, then it certainly will die. I think that would be a shame. I’d be ashamed of myself if I stood by and watched it happen without having said anything. That’s what brings me to my keyboard tonight.

Second, His election will be a needlessly polarizing event….

Third, I fear that, even after his election were over, if it were to occur, he would prove to be a polarizing personality….

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