To God Be The Glory | Part Two

August 11, 2016

Franklin Kirksey | Pastor
First Baptist Church, Spanish Fort, AL

2. Note the conduit of blessing from God.
A conduit is, “A means by which something is transmitted.”[1]  Trust in the Lord is a conduit of blessing from God.  Psalm 115:9-15 reads, “O Israel, trust in the Lord; He is their help and their shield.  O house of Aaron, trust in the Lord; He is their help and their shield.  You who fear the Lord, trust in the Lord; He is their help and their shield.  The Lord has been mindful of us; He will bless us; He will bless the house of Israel; He will bless the house of Aaron.  He will bless those who fear the Lord, Both small and great.  May the Lord give you increase more and more, You and your children.  May you be blessed by the Lord, Who made heaven and earth.”

Note the exhortation to trust. Imagine the following being read responsively with the priest and the people: “O Israel, trust in the Lord; He is their help and their shield. O house of Aaron, trust in the Lord; He is their help and their shield. You who fear the Lord, trust in the Lord; He is their help and their shield” (Psalm 115:9-11).

In a similar fashion Psalm 118:1-4 reads, “Oh, give thanks to the Lord, for He is good!  For His mercy endures forever.  Let Israel now say, ‘His mercy endures forever.’ Let the house of Aaron now say, ‘His mercy endures forever.’ Let those who fear the Lord now say, ‘His mercy endures forever.’”  Psalm 135:19-21 reads, “Bless the Lord, O house of Israel! Bless the Lord, O house of Aaron! Bless the Lord, O house of Levi! You who fear the Lord, bless the Lord! Blessed be the Lord out of Zion, Who dwells in Jerusalem! Praise the Lord!”

Note the expectation of trust. Psalm 115:12-15 reads, “The Lord has been mindful of us; He will bless us; He will bless the house of Israel; He will bless the house of Aaron.  He will bless those who fear the Lord, Both small and great.  May the Lord give you increase more and more, You and your children.  May you be blessed by the Lord, Who made heaven and earth.”

Dr. Warren W. Wiersbe writes, “‘Trust the Lord and He will give His blessing’ is the theme of this section, and how the discouraged remnant needed that assurance! . . . Because Jehovah God is the ‘Maker of heaven and earth’. . . . we should worship Him and not what He has created or what we manufacture ourselves.”[2]  Isaiah 40-48 provides a divinely inspired polemic against idolatry. Jeremiah 10:11 reads, “Thus you shall say to them: ‘The gods that have not made the heavens and the earth shall perish from the earth and from under these heavens.’”  If you could explore the vastness of the universe with the most powerful telescope, and the intricacies of the human body with the most powerful microscope; it would be impossible to say it just happened by accident.  If people could just get it in their minds that God created everything that was made.

3. Note the concert of praise to God.
Psalm 115:16-18 reads, “The heaven, even the heavens, are the Lord’s; But the earth He has given to the children of men.  The dead do not praise the Lord, Nor any who go down into silence.  But we will bless the Lord From this time forth and forevermore.  Praise the Lord!” Drs. Charles F. Pfeiffer and Everett F. Harrison refer to Psalm 115:16-18 as “A Chorus of Praise. We will bless the Lord… for evermore. The Lord who created both the heavens and the earth has reserved the heavens for his domain. To man he has given the earth and the right to praise him here and now. In the thinking of most writers, death ends the opportunity for further worship. Hence the urgency of the exhortation, Praise ye the Lord.”[3] 

Dr. Michael Guido (1915-2009) had the following unattributed clipping in his files:

NO orchestra begins a presentation without preparation.  All the instruments must be brought into tune with a standard.  At the time of tuning, an observer, hearing the variety of sounds, might conclude that something has gone wrong with the orchestra.  The strings, the brass, the woodwinds—all seem to be out of tune.  But when the conductor steps to the podium and begins to lead an orchestra in a composition of Handel or Beethoven, all doubt is removed concerning the value of tune up time.  The preparation is necessary for the presentation.

. . . we can suggest some guidelines for those wanting to be in tune. [To be in tune with God is the essence of revival!  You are either in tune or out of tune with God.  There is no middle ground.]

First, you must recognize Christ as the Conductor.  His word and His judgment are final.  When He indicates to us that our lives are out of tune, we must humbly accept His judgment and seek to find the cause of the problem.  If each member of the Church would recognize the Lordship of Christ in this matter, then there would be much less disunity and much more harmony among us.

Second, there must be a willingness to play the part that has been assigned.  In any orchestra some instruments have a greater and more important part to play than others.  But this does not mean the other instruments can become silent in protest.  Each part is necessary if the composer’s goal is to be achieved.  So it is in the Church.  The Holy Spirit has assigned different parts to those in the Church.  Not all are gifted with the ability to preach or to sing or to teach.  Some have gifts that may appear minor.  The truth is, however, that Christ looks for the practice of each gift in the Church.

Third, if there is to be harmony in the Church there must be a willingness for the glory to go to God.  At the end of a concert it is the conductor who bows to accept the adulation of the crowd.  It was because of his skill that the orchestra was able to play together and to present such pleasing music.

In the Church the glory for all that is accomplished must go to Christ.  It is because of the work of His Spirit in the lives of His people that anything at all is accomplished.”[4]

Dr. Warren W. Wiersbe writes, “To ‘bless the Lord’ means to ascribe all glory and praise to Him, to delight His heart with our joyful and willing thanksgiving and obedience.”[5]

Rev. Charles H. Spurgeon writes, “‘God be the glory’ should always be the preacher’s motto.”[6]  Actually, “To God be the glory” should be every believer’s motto!  Rev. Spurgeon explains, “Though the dead cannot, the wicked will not and the careless do not praise God, yet we will shout ‘Hallelujah’ for ever and ever.”[7]  To God be the glory!

 

 

[1]American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2011 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved. Accessed: 07/30/16 http://www.thefreedictionary.com/conduit .
[2]Wiersbe, Exposition, 301-302.
[3]Wycliffe, Pfeiffer, 538.
[4]“In Tune” (Psalm 115) Guido Gardens Library Psalm 115, #071.pdf.
[5]Wiersbe, Exposition, 302.
[6]The Biblical Illustrator, ed. Joseph S. Exell, Psalms, Charles H. Spurgeon “Non nobis, Domine!” Database © 2012 WORDsearch Corp
[7]Ibid.