Rite of Passage Parenting:
That’s Not Right

August 4, 2012

By Walker Moore

Too often, I take a look at something and the first thought that comes to mind is … that’s not right. I don’t know why, but I shake my head from side to side whenever that thought reaches my consciousness.

Not long ago, a friend sent me a picture from a store that features souvenirs from the city of Tulsa. On the rack of knickknacks, he found a series of small shot glasses. (Since I’m a Baptist, I’ve only seen these in places like Stuckey’s.) Each shot glass contained the words, “Tulsa, Oklahoma” inscribed in a circle. At the center of the circle was a drawing of the praying hands statue at Oral Roberts University. After one look at these little glasses adorned with praying hands, all I could think was … that’s not right. But I seem to have that thought often.

When I’m driving down the road enjoying life and my engine starts to make a sound like a squealing pig, my first thought is … that’s not right.

When I see a newborn baby who looks like a raisin with a pointed head, I can’t help but think … that’s not right.

When my sons first learned to put on their own shoes and wore them on the wrong feet, I would think … that’s not right.

When I look at a church bulletin and see the sermon title, “Don’t let worry kill you—let the church help,” I say to myself … that’s not right.

When I’m shopping at the mall and see a sign advertising, “Ears Pierced Half Off,” I know … that’s not right.

When I open the refrigerator and can’t tell if what I see is meat loaf or chocolate pie, I’m sure … that’s not right.

When I’m checking out at the grocery store and the cashier tells me, “That’ll be $6.66,” I’m thinking … that’s not right.

When I go to the beach and see an overweight man wearing a Speedo, I turn my head the other way, knowing … that’s not right.

One day on the mission field, the students kept looking at me and flashing cheesy grins. As the day went on, the grins got bigger and bigger. They finally told me that early in the morning, they had switched the arch supports in my shoes. As I rubbed my aching soles, I was thinking … that’s not right.

Plenty of other events bring that same thought to my mind. When I visit a church and see throngs of people entering the sanctuary with only a handful of Bibles among them, I sigh and think … that’s not right.

After serving in Third World churches and coming home to speak to a youth group whose walls are lined with tens of thousands of dollars worth of plasma screens and video games, I’m sure … that’s not right.

When I hear the statistic that evangelicals spends more on dog food than they give to missions, I tell myself… that’s not right.

When I read in the Scriptures that “The harvest is plentiful but the workers are few” (Matthew 9:37), I can’t help but be grieved in my spirit as I think … that’s not right.

When I hear of another church splitting, and as I remember the Bible says the world will know we are His by the love we have for one another (John 13:35), I have to think … that’s not right.

When I hear that churches no longer have real prayer meetings, yet Jesus says, “My house will be called a house of prayer” (Matthew 21:13), I can’t help but think … that’s not right.

I see most things as black and white: right is right and wrong is wrong. For most of my life, the Bible has decided right and wrong for me. But when the Word of God is being diluted in our churches, you can be sure our homes will dilute it even more. The voice of reason that guides my life doesn’t come from mere human consciousness but from words that are holy and have the power to set me free.

My friends, our society doesn’t have a sin problem. Christ took care of that on the cross 2,000 years ago. What we have today is a word problem. Jesus said, “If you hold to my teaching, you are really my disciples.  Then you will know the truth, and the truth will set you free” (John 8:31, 32).

Mom and Dad, Grandma and Grandpa: When the truth abides, lives, dwells and resides in you, your children and your grandchildren, you can rest assured that they’ll know when to say … that’s not right.

 

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Norm Miller

All this time SBCToday readers haven’t had access here to Walker’s insights? … That’s not right. But will Walker’s column begin appearing here every week … That’s right! — Norm

    selahV

    Norm, fantastic choice of columnists. We read him all the time in our “messenger” provided by our church. So glad to see him here. Very glad. selahV

    Manoj G

    Wonderful! Very encouraging. I love Walker’s passion for missions.

Mary

Well done Walker! I’ll look forward to seeing more!

Hey Norm, you know what would be great here at Today? A blog aggregator! You know one of those blocks where you can get links to other SBC blogs on a daily basis. I’ve been wondering if SBC Today would be staying the same or if we could expect some “upgrades” and changes under the new management. But definately you need to get a blog aggregator to give people access to all the different “voices” in the SBC ;)

    Norm Miller

    Thx, Mary, for your input. There are several changes on the drawing board, and the aggregator is but one. Again, Thx. — Norm

      Mary

      Norm, THANK YOU! Thank you for all the work you’re doing and thank you and please thank all those “behind the curtain” here for making SBC Today a place for SBC Trads to go to find others “like them.” I can’t tell you how refreshing it is to see articles where people actually “get it” – it being what I believe the Bible teaches.

      I’ll look forward to the days ahead here at SBC Today!

        Tom Parker

        Mary:

        Are you linking this post to non-calvinism? I am not shocked at all that– this is the place for Trads.

        Are you for removing the Calvinists from the SBC, Mary?

          Norm Miller

          Tom: In other places you have remarked about ‘liberals’ being removed from the SBC, with ‘liberals’ being in quotations marks, and referring to the CBF. Well, you and your friends left volitionally. The CBF is its own entity. But I wonder why you write ‘liberal’ thusly. The quote marks indicate that you don’t think a CFB-affiliated chaplain who attends a homosexual wedding is liberal. Can you explain your position on this matter, please? — Norm

          Lydia

          Tom, Women in the SBC are not allowed to have such power. :o) Only the entity head guys are allowed to “marginalize” people.

          Mary

          Tom,

          No I didn’t mention Calvinism at all. I simply made a statement about how nice it was to have a place where I can read posts from people like me. You troll Tom are the one trying to mix up in your usual trollish way.

          No I don’t want to kick Calvinists out. I want to stop Calvinists from discriminating against Trads as they do at the Seminaries. I also don’t want NAMB church plants to be overwhelmingly Calvinist. If Lifeway wants to put together a Calvinist SS curriculum that’s fine but they need to be upfront and market it as such. The only people I ever see who are actively kicking people out and discriminating on soteriology are the Calvinist.

          selahV

          Tom, notice clearly who brought up the “C” word here. It was you. If you do not want to discuss “C” and are tired of hearing about “C”, why do you constantly show up to goad anyone you can into an argument regarding “C” or “CR”? hmmmn?

          Truth be known, it appears to me that…even if a person writes about bugs, you’d show up and dig through everyone’s comments, seeking imaginary ants burrowing beneath the ground during the CR so you can shoot them with spit-wads, or swat the flies you seem to think land on a “C” and bite them, and then call them anti-“Cs”. Little can be written that you do not want to stir up others into things which they are not even talking about. My momma use to call this kind of behavior, “instigating”. selahV

        Mary

        And Tom FYI the Calvinist who keep throwing out the Strawman charge that Trads are antiCalvinist who want to get rid of all the Calvinists are Calvinist who are trying to stifle dissent. Those people do not want a discussion. They do not want the people in the pews to know that we have Calvinist seminaries and that NAMB is focused on planting Calvinist churches. Calvinists use the term antiCalvinist and the claim that anyone wants to kick them out as a form of attack. The attacks and the name calling need to stop.

          selahV

          Oh Mary, you bit the bait. I do believe Tom’s sole purpose in life on blogs is to keep people fighting one another. It is a sad waste of time. I don’t get it, really. He agrees that contention is something to avoid, yet all he does is stir it up. May God bless his life with something beautiful and happy today and tomorrow and each one after that. He seems very lonely to me. selahV

            Mary

            Hariette, I know I shouldn’t feed the trolls, but I gave in to temptation ;)

            I just think it’s funny that Tom is still hung up on the CR and the people who think the CR didn’t go far enough are the Calvinists. Yet he’s chosen the side of the people who not only wanted to get rid of people like him, but now they want to get rid of anyone who’s not Calvinist like them! He’s showing a complete ignorance of the politics involved in this whole mess.

              Norm Miller

              Mary / selahV: What befuddles me is Tom’s constant complaining about the SBC when he is no longer part of it. There is plenty to fix in the CBF, but he wants to range from home to throw bombs at us. In the very near future, this sort of behavior will not be tolerated at this site. We will want folks to stay on topic, not impugn motives, refrain from pontificating in baseless generalities, and disagree (if they choose) w/o being disagreeable. These and other parameters will apply to any and all who want to join the discussion. — Norm

          Mary

          Oh Norm, you mean I’m going to have to play nice?

            Norm Miller

            Yes, play nice or not at all. — Norm

      selahV

      Norm, an aggregator is a splendid idea… ;) selahV

selahV

Walker, when I think of all the comments which bring little glory to God, I think, “that’s not right”. I am grateful for that statement about grandchildren; it is sooo right. Thanks so much for such a refreshing post today. selahV

Lydia

One of the things that amused me about this post is that my daughter and I play the “that’s not right” game all the time with things that are just fun and silly and then things that are serious. And it is a fun teaching tool because we can then discuss WHY it’s not right without it being a lecture.

Miles Morrison

Am I the only person that read the title “rite of passage parenting: that’s not right” and then wondered why the article had nothing to do with rites of passage or parenting? Did I miss something? This wasn’t necessarily a bad piece (enjoyed some of the humor), but I’m just confused about what the point of it was.

Miles Morrison

My apologies, I just saw the previous post introducing Walker Moore’s column “rite of passage parenting.” I still feel the title of the column is somewhat misleading because this really doesn’t have anything to do with parenting.

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