Category: SWBTS

Podcast Episode 22

This week on the podcast, we discuss issues surrounding the allegations made by a Dallas area television station against Ed Young, Jr., and Fellowship Church. Joining us as our guest to help define some of those issues is Dr. John Mark Yeats. Dr. Yeats is assistant professor of church history at Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary, and author, along with his SWBTS colleague Dr. Thomas White, of Franchising McChurch, a book that deals with issues of commercialism and “branding” among large contemporary churches. We went over our self-imposed time limit of half an hour, but hopefully listeners will find the discussion to be worth the time.

You can use the player below to listen to the podcast, or you can click the image in this post (or the sidebar link) to be taken to our iTunes page. There, you can subscribe to the podcast, download past episodes, write a review, or give us a rating. All of the above are strongly encouraged. And please leave your comment here with suggestions for how we can improve future podcasts or for guests you’d like to see in the future. And as always, thanks for listening.

Links to some items discussed:

Podcast Episode 5

podcast logoWe’re back with episode five of the SBC Today podcast. This time, I’m joined by Robin Foster, Scott Gordon, and Joe Stewart, and with a smaller crew comes a shorter podcast, this time coming in under thirty minutes. We were all over the place in terms of topics in this episode, from the President Obama’s health care initiative to Baptists in Romania to tornadoes in Minnesota.

You can listen to the podcast right from the site using the player below, or, as many folks have done, subscribe to our podcast in iTunes and have it downloaded immediately when it becomes available each week. Click the podcast image in this post or the link in the sidebar to be taken to our iTunes page, and while you’re there, give us a rating and/or a review. We’d appreciate feedback, which you can put in a review there, or in a comment here. Let us know how we can improve the podcast.

Below are some links to the items we discussed in this episode. See you next week on the podcast.

Evangelism: The Work of the Resurrection

I’m grateful to Dr. David Mills, Associate Professor of Evangelism and Assistant Dean of Applied Ministry at Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary, for writing and allowing us to publish this great challenge for us regarding evangelism.

In the resurrection chapter of 1 Corinthians 15, Paul says much about evangelism. He says he declares to the Corinthians the gospel, which he preached to them previously (v.1). He said they could rest assured of their salvation if they held fast to the word he preached to them (v.2). He delivered to them first what he had received, namely Christ’s death, burial, resurrection, and appearances (v.3—4). He remarks that though he was least among the apostles, he preached and the Corinthians believed (v.11). He imagines Christians declaring the risen Christ (v.12). In fact, this is a point of contention in favor of Christ’s resurrection. Paul reasons that if Christ did not rise from the dead, he preached in vain (v.14) and was guilty of false witness against God because he had testified to Christ’s resurrection (v.15). To the Corinthians’ shame he chastises them that they had failed to introduce others to God (v.34). He tells them of the mystery of the resurrection of believers (v.51). Paul anticipates that believers in the resurrection would prioritize evangelism. Believers manifest their faith in the resurrection by working at evangelism.

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Poisoning the Fountains of Truth: Part One

This is part of an article originally published January 1922 in the Southwestern Journal of Theology by Dr. L. R. Scarborough entitled, “Poisoning the Fountains of Truth.” It was republished in the most recent Southwestern Journal of Theology, “Baptists and Unity.” May a voice of our past speak to us today. Below is part one of a four part series reprinting Dr. Scarborough’s essay:

Poisoning the Fountains of Truth

Christ’s churches are the most important institutions in the world. He gave them a definite form of government, a specific character of membership, set up in them the two ordinances, gave to them the great body of the truth found in the New testament, set for them their officers, and committed to them the great task of winning the world to Him and building His great Kingdom. He says through His inspired apostles in 1 Timothy 3:15 that this organization which He set up and called His church is “the pillar and ground of the truth.” He says this church was purchased by His blood; and in His spiritual economy He calls this institution His Bride. All this and many other things in the New testament indicate that these spiritual organizations set up by Christ and established in many places by the apostles and which have for their successors these New testament churches of today are the most important institutions in all the world. These churches are to keep, guard, and promote the ordinances. They are to propagate the gospel. They are to win souls. They are both the preservers and the heralds of the gospel truth. They are to establish Christ’s Kingdom and to make Christ King in all the world. From any angle you look at these churches their importance is magnified.

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Missing the Point of the Text

I have passed the half-way point of my two week seminars here at Southwestern. Because of my blogging slavemaster friend, Wes Kenney, :-D I find myself writing a post instead of working on my DMin assignments. Yet I am reminded of why I entered this program back in 2007. At that time I would have considered myself an expository preacher, but today, as I look back, I was anything but one. Back then I would taken a text like Genesis 39 and the incident of Joseph and Potiphar’s wife and preached on how to keep oneself from sexual sin. I would have used the lives of both Joseph and of Potiphar’s wife to illustrate techniques and habits that could help in keeping oneself pure. I would have proclaimed, “Be like Joseph!” while missing the point of the text. Yes, my sermon may have been biblically true on those points, but it would not have been scripturally based according to the original intent of Genesis 39. In all this, I would have claimed to be an expositor of the scriptures. I was wrong and I knew I needed to change.

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