Category Archives for Prayer

A Resolution on the “Sinner’s Prayer”
to be presented at the SBC in New Orleans, June 2012

June 15, 2012


By Dr. Eric Hankins, Pastor of the
First Baptist Church in Oxford, Mississippi


WHEREAS, God desires for every person to be saved and has made salvation available for any person who hears the Gospel (John 3:16; Romans 10:14-17; 1 Timothy 2:3-4; 2 Peter 3:9; 1 John 2:2); and

WHEREAS, A free response to the Holy Spirit’s drawing through the Gospel is both possible and necessary in order for anyone to be born again (John 3:1-16; Acts 16:30-31; Romans 10:11-13; 1 Thessalonians 2:13); and

WHEREAS, Prayer is God’s gracious means through which any person can communicate with Him and is everywhere in Scripture commanded and commended for every matter and every person (2 Chronicles 7:14; Matthew 7:7-11; Mark 11:17; Philippians 4:6); and

WHEREAS, Praying to God to express repentance for sins, to acknowledge Christ as Lord, and to ask for forgiveness and salvation is modeled in the Bible (Acts 2:37-38; Romans 10:9-10); and

WHEREAS, While there is no one uniform wording found in Scripture or in the churches for a “Sinner’s Prayer,” the prayer of repentance and faith, acknowledging salvation through Christ alone and expressing complete surrender to His Lordship, is the biblical means by which any person can turn from sin and self, place his faith in Christ, and find forgiveness and eternal life (Luke 18:9-14, 23:39-43); and

WHEREAS, It is biblically appropriate to help a sinner in calling on the Lord for salvation and to speak of Christ’s response to such a prayer as “entering a sinner’s heart and life” (John 14:23; Acts 2:37-40; 16:29-30; Romans 10:11-17; Ephesians 3:17); and

WHEREAS, A “Sinner’s Prayer” is not an incantation that results in salvation merely by its recitation and should never be manipulatively employed or utilized apart from a clear articulation of the Gospel (Matthew 6:7, 15:7-9; 28:18-20); now, therefore, be it

RESOLVED, That the Southern Baptist Convention, meeting in New Orleans, LA, June 19-20, 2012, commend the use of a “Sinner’s Prayer” as a biblically sound and spiritually significant component of the evangelistic task of the church; and be it further

RESOLVED, That we encourage all Christians to enthusiastically and intentionally proclaim the Gospel to sinners everywhere, being prepared to give them the reason for the hope we have in Christ (I Peter 3:15), and being prepared to lead them to confess faith in Christ (Romans 10:9), including praying to receive Him as Savior and Lord (John 1:12).

Why and How to Pray Scripture

January 29, 2012

Dr. Bailey has been the Senior Pastor of First Baptist Church, Covington, Louisiana, since 1989.  He formerly served as Professor of Old Testament at New Orleans Baptist Theological Seminary from 1978 to 1995. He has authored five books: Step by Step through the Old Testament; Biblical Hebrew Grammar; Joshua: Courage for the Future; As You Go: Biblical Foundation for Evangelism; and (with Kenneth Barker) Micah, Nahum, Habbakuk, and Zephaniah in the New American Commentary. He is the current President of the Louisiana Baptist Convention


God wants to grow us in our faith. This is the process of sanctification. He sanctifies us, and we work with Him in the process. When you read and study the Bible, pray, and serve, you are working with God in His work of sanctification in our lives.

Praying Scripture is a wonderful part of our growth in Christ.

Here’s why you should do so.

Praying Scripture means that you are praying in the will of God. Because we are praying according to His Word, we can be assured that we are praying in His Will.

Praying Scripture means that we are pleasing God. He gives us His Word. Our praying Scripture shows that we want to please Him (Ephesians 5:10).

Praying Scripture means that we can adequately praise Him. I often feel inadequate to praise God. When I pray the great words of praise to Him, my inadequacy is removed. I particularly pray Psalm 8:1: “O Lord, our LORD, how majestic is your name in all the earth!” I also often pray Psalm 103:1-2: “Praise the LORD, O my soul; all my inmost being, praise his holy name. Praise the LORD, O my soul and forget not his benefits.”

Finally, praying Scripture means that you will access the power of God in your life. Instead of simply getting what you can do, praying Scripture means that you also receive what God can do to conform you to His image.

My Scripture prayer at this time is Ephesians 4:32: “Be kind to one another, tenderhearted, forgiving one another, as God in Christ forgave you.” Praying that verse makes me conscious of what God wants me to be, and through prayer I receive the power of God to do what I cannot do.

Here’s a way to get started.

Simply select a passage of Scripture to pray. I suggest Philippians 2:5: “Your attitude should be the same as that of Christ Jesus” who humbled himself and became obedient. You might pick Ephesians 4:32 as well.

Also, spend a few minutes with God to ask Him, “What do you want to change in my life?” Then, select a passage of Scripture to deal with the issue. You may have to read the verse to God first, but soon you will be able to recite it–another wonderful advantage of this new discipline.

What Scripture passage are you planning to pray through?


This blog article was originally posted on WaylonBailey.com and is being reposted by permission of the author.

Lessons Learned from Iraq that Apply to Ministry Anywhere:
A Southern Baptist Chaplain in Action

June 5, 2011

By Dr. Page Brooks, Chaplain for the Louisiana National Guard, Assistant Professor of Theology and Islamic Studies at New Orleans Baptist Theological Seminary, and Founding Co-Pastor of the Mosaic Church in New Orleans

Throughout the Bible we see where God sometimes leads individuals into the desert to teach them some powerful spiritual lessons. Whether it was the Israelites, John the Baptist, or Jesus Himself, the desert experience was always powerful in bringing to life spiritual truths.

I had my own experience in learning spiritual lessons in the desert, but this particular trip was because of my role as a military chaplain while I was deployed to Iraq in 2010. I serve as a chaplain with the Louisiana National Guard and deployed with the 1-141 Field Artillery out of New Orleans, Louisiana. We served in two locations of Iraq during the year. In the first part of our deployment we were stationed in Tallil, near the Kuwaiti border. Our soldiers performed convoy operations all over Iraq, starting from our base in Tallil. The second half of the deployment we were stationed in the International Zone, Baghdad. We provided security for areas of the International Zone and the US Embassy.

Though we went through loss of life and other difficult situations, I had wonderful deployment. I loved being with my soldiers and ministering to their needs. In the midst of the incredible ministry with the soldiers, God not only used me to touch their lives, but God used them to teach me a few lessons of my own that I would use when I returned to the States as I returned to my teaching ministry and church plant.
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