Category: Guest Author

The Righteous Ones
Psalm 112:1-10

By Franklin L. Kirksey, Pastor, First Baptist Church of Spanish Fort, Alabama, and author of Sound Biblical Preaching: Giving the Bible a Voice.

These expositions by Dr. Kirksey are offered to suggest sermon or Bible study ideas for pastors and other church leaders, both from the exposition and from the illustrative material, or simply for personal devotion.

 


Introduction

The righteous ones are like the Righteous One.  We read in Psalm 11:7, “For the LORD is righteous; He loves righteousness; The upright will behold His face.”

Rev. Charles Haddon Spurgeon (1834-1892) comments, “There is no title to this psalm, but it is evidently a companion to the hundred and eleventh, and, like it, it is an alphabetical psalm.  Even in the number of verses, and clauses of each verse, it coincides with its predecessor, as also in many of its words and phrases.  The reader should carefully compare the two psalms line by line.  The subject of the poem before us is — the blessedness of the righteous man, and so it bears the same relation to the preceding which the moon does to the sun; for, while the first declares the glory of God, the second speaks of the reflection of the divine brightness in men born from above.  God is here praised for the manifestation of his glory which is seen in his people, just as in the preceding psalm he was magnified for his own personal acts.  The hundred and eleventh speaks of the great Father, and this describes his children renewed after his image.  The psalm cannot be viewed as the extolling of man, for it commences with ‘Praise ye the Lord;’ and it is intended to give to God all the honour of his grace which is manifested in the sons of God.”[1]

Dr. William Binnie (1823-1886), Professor of Church History and Pastoral Theology, Free Church College, Aberdeen, explains, “The hundred and eleventh and the hundred and twelfth psalms, two very short poems, dating apparently from the latest age of inspired psalmody, present such features of resemblance as to leave no doubt that they came from the same pen.  In structure they are identical; and this superficial resemblance is designed to call attention to something deeper and more important.  The subject of the one is the exact counterpart of the subject of the other.  The first celebrates the character and works of God; the second, the character and felicity of the godly man.”[2]

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Beyond Words

by Walker Moore

Walker heads up Awe Star Ministries, a missions organization that has put thousands of young people on the mission fields of the world. This ministry has facilitated the proclamation of the Gospel to untold multitudes from which hundreds of souls have repented of their sins and placed their faith and trust in Jesus Christ. Go to www.awestar.org to learn more about how you can put the teens in your sphere of influence on the mission field.


Not long ago, I visited a dollar store. Since I don’t usually have a dollar, I don’t go to stores like this often. Besides, by the time you add taxes, everything costs more than a dollar anyway.

Another customer caught my attention. At first I thought she was talking to herself, but I soon realized she was addressing a young boy about six years old. I’m not the sharpest pencil in the box, but I knew her remarks wouldn’t help this child develop into a capable, responsible, self-reliant adult. In fact, if he was like most kids, he quit listening soon after she began her tirade.

I didn’t have a pencil or paper to write everything down, and I didn’t want to whip out my cell phone and start recording. But this woman’s words went on and on. I never once heard her pause for breath. Since I didn’t quite get it all, I tried my best to write down what I remembered and fill in the blanks from my own childhood. Take a deep breath and read the next three paragraphs aloud. “What were you thinking? What do you have to say for yourself? Don’t you hear me talking to you? If I’ve told you once, I’ve told you a thousand times not to do that. How many times do I have to tell you? Why can’t you ever do anything right? Wait till your dad gets home. You’ll get what you deserve! Do you want a spanking? I’ll give you a reason to cry. Bring me the belt. I’m going to count to three: 1 … 2 …

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The Lord and His People

By Franklin L. Kirksey, Pastor, First Baptist Church of Spanish Fort, Alabama, and author of Sound Biblical Preaching: Giving the Bible a Voice.

These expositions by Dr. Kirksey are offered to suggest sermon or Bible study ideas for pastors and other church leaders, both from the exposition and from the illustrative material, or simply for personal devotion.


Psalm 111:1-10

Introduction

The Lord and His people comprise the focus of Psalm 111.  Someone might point out this psalm specifically refers to Jehovah and the Jews, His chosen people.  While that is correct, as believers in the Lord Jesus Christ, “You are a chosen generation, a royal priesthood, a holy nation, His own special people, that you may proclaim the praises of Him who called you out of darkness into His marvelous light; who once were not a people but are now the people of God, who had not obtained mercy but now have obtained mercy” (1 Peter 2:9-10).

Psalm 111 is an alphabetical or acrostic Psalm.  There are several others such as, Psalm 9, 10, 24, 34, 37, 112, 119, and 145.  Dr. William Theophilus Davison (1846-1935), Tutor in Systematic Theology, Handsworth College, Birmingham, England, explains, “The principle of the Acrostic is well known, but few English readers recognise how freely it is used in the Hebrew Psalter.  The example of the 119th Psalm, in which are twenty-two stanzas, each with eight verses beginning with the same Hebrew letter, is familiar.  But a similar arrangement is more or less observed in Psalms ix.  and x., in which two verses occur to each letter, but the plan is imperfectly carried out; also in xxv., with one verse to each letter, xxxiv., xxxvii, cxi., and cxii.  (in the last two cases only half a verse to a letter), and cxlv.  Psalm cxi.  has been thus arranged in English ¹, in order to exhibit the structure. . .”  Dr. Davison cites a few lines of the Acrostic from the work of Dr. William Binnie (1823-1886), Professor of Church History and Pastoral Theology, Free Church College, Aberdeen, titled Psalms, their History, Teachings, and Use.[1] While Dr. Binnie wrote an Acrostic for Psalm 111 and 112, allow me to share Dr. Binnie’s Acrostic for Psalm 111:

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Rite of Passage Parenting:
iPhone: The New Pacifier

By Walker Moore


I’m proud of myself because I’ve hit another mile marker. I’ve only had my iPhone for about six months and have already mastered turning it on, making a call and charging it up every night. Just don’t ask me about text messaging and video chatting. I think I have a few more lessons to go.

The other day, I was at the doctor’s office when a mother with three little girls came in and sat near me. The longer these young ladies remained in the waiting the room, the more fidgety they became. At last, the mother pulled out her iPhone and handed it to the oldest daughter, who began to go through some different apps.

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Rite of Passage Parenting:
Yes, Jesus Loves Me

By Walker Moore

For someone who isn’t a writer, coming up with an article each week is a daunting task. One of the problems I face is that I have only one mind, 10 ten fingers and 26 letters to work with. I sometimes think if we just had a few more letters in our alphabet, my job would be much easier. The Germans have 30 letters, the Armenians have 38; and when I lived in Budapest, Hungary, I was jealous because they have 44 letters in their alphabet. Oh, what could I do with 44 letters.

I still feel a little slighted that I don’t have as much to work with as the Hungarians. Sometimes I think if I can’t have more letters in the alphabet, a couple more fingers would help. But I have a hard time getting the 10 I have to cooperate; and the older they get, the less they want to act like team players.

I have to admit, the mind I have is not normal. It runs at 100 miles an hour with gusts up to 200. Trying to get my thoughts through a set of lips with a governor that keeps them from going over 40 miles per hour can be interesting. So with a hundred mile an hour brain, 40 mile an hour lips, three mile an hour fingers and only 26 letters to work with, you can see the challenges I face each week.

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