Category: Calvinism

The TULIP’s Petals and Sepals, part 2

by Ronnie Rogers

  1. Unconditional Election: God chose for some to be the objects of His unmerited favor, and salvation is totally a work of God—monergistic.Calvinism’s understanding of unconditional election necessarily includes that God has selected to give the salvifically required new nature to only some of His vast humanity even though all are in equally desperate need of such in order to experience salvation. Accordingly, it has pleased God to select some of His created people to experience incomprehensible eternal bliss while being equally pleased to withhold this surety from the vast majority of His humanity; thereby, ensuring their equally incomprehensible eternal suffering in the cauldron of inescapable torment of pain and the absolute loss of love and hope in hell.

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The TULIP’s Petals and Sepals, part 1

by Ronnie Rogers

Before you make the TULIP your flower of choice, consider it in full bloom.

TULIP is used acronymically to succinctly point out the major emphases of Calvinism. I well understand that the use of the TULIP does not fully illustrate the depth and breadth of Calvinism. I do understand that some believe the acronym has outlived its usefulness. However, it still enjoys ubiquitous usage among Calvinists and non-Calvinists alike. I find this to be particularly true among those seeking to explain Calvinism to people who may demonstrate some interest in understanding Calvinism, or as a simple tool to convince young people of its biblical and systematic cogency. I am not considering this acronym in order to either portray Calvinism simplistically or inaccurately. Rather, I use it in the manner described by Roger Nicole when he said, “the five points provide a classic framework which is quite well adapted for the expression of certain distinguishing emphases of Calvinism.”

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Super Spirituality Syndrome: Claiming More Christ or Gospel Than Others

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by Rick Patrick

I will never forget where I was when I first heard the term super spiritual separatism. It was a classroom discussion in one of my first doctoral seminars. I had openly shared my experience about some church members whose preferences were causing conflict in the fellowship. Hot dogs were out since they were a “man made” food instead of a “God made” food. Candy at church, particularly around Halloween, was problematic for their eight children. Even our annual Fall Festival Halloween alternative was offensive, as they preferred to recognize Martin Luther’s birthday, presumably by nailing pieces of paper on doors all day long. These people loved Jesus and possessed sweet attitudes in their conversation. It was not so much their behavior that offended everyone, but the unmistakable sense of spiritual superiority manifested in all of their rule following.

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The Indwelling of the Holy Spirit in Regeneration

by Bob Hadley

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A lot has been written about Jesus’ statement to Nicodemus, “Most assuredly, I say to you, unless one is born again, he cannot see the kingdom of God.” (Jn 3:3 NKJV) Jesus repeats Himself in verse 7, “Do not marvel that I said to you, ‘You must be born again.’” There is no question regarding the importance of being born again, but there is much debate regarding what Jesus meant when He said what He said. What did Jesus mean when He said, “You must be born again?”

Basically, there are two primary interpretations as to the how and when one is “born again” or regenerated, and both are related to belief, repentance and faith. One posits being born again as being essential for belief, repentance and faith to take place; and the other makes belief, repentance and faith essential for being born again. This article will examine these two positions in light of the Scriptural significance of the indwelling of the Holy Spirit as it relates to being born again.

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One Man’s Suggestions for Calvinists and Non-Calvinists, Part 2

by Ronnie Rogers

Non-Calvinism’s challenge is to develop systematic theologies and comprehensive systematic interpretive approaches that seek to explain the soteriological perplexities of Scripture biblically, consistently, and comprehensively.

This suggestion is not intended to depreciate nor ignore works in this area (particularly some superb individual books addressing various aspects of Calvinism), but rather to draw attention to the need for considerably more to be done. I am primarily thinking of theologies that can be used in SBC theological training of students and pastors who, when aware of the disquieting realities of Calvinism, reject Calvinism.

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