Author Archive

Is *All* church growth kingdom growth? / Unappreciated Pastor

RevNorespect

Originally titled:
How to Close the Deal
by Unappreciated Pastor*

It’s no secret that much of church “growth” isn’t kingdom growth at all. New church members often join a church because they have either moved to a new town or are frustrated with the church they are currently in. As pastors we are aware of this. Most pastors don’t seem to mind the fish swapping aquaria.  In fact many pastors just want to see the sanctuary full on Sunday mornings. And if we are not careful, we can resemble a sleazy new car salesman more than a pastor. So that’s the subject of this blog. Let’s call it “How to Close the Deal.”

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Big Men, Big Hearts: Criswell & Bisagno

Walker-Moore-100

by Walker Moore
founder/president
Awe Star Ministries

I had the privilege of speaking at all three services at Houston’s First Baptist the first Sunday of January. I was familiar with this congregation largely because of its longtime pastor, Dr. John Bisagno. A while back, I spoke in the chapel for a youth missions conference. I could never have guessed that I would look out at the congregation to see Dr. Bisagno.

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Harvard Ph.D/TMC professor to lecture @NOBTS

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Event Announcement

The Faith Fabric of Creation and the Priority of the Word: A Case for Young Age Creationism

Presented by Dr. Kurt Wise, Professor of Natural History and Director of the Creation Research Center at Truett-McConnell College. Dr. Wise holds a Ph.D. in Paleontology from Harvard University, having trained under Dr. Stephen Jay Gould.

Co-Sponsored by the NOBTS Theological and Historical Division and the Baptist Center for Theology and Ministry.

Friday, February 21, 2014
3:00-4:00 pm
Room 219, Hardin Student Center, NOBTS

NOBTS to offer free, post-event, downloadable audio.

Why I Write as I Do / Unappreciated Pastor

RevNorespect

by Unappreciated Pastor
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Copyright 2014 / Unappreciated Pastor / All Rights Reserved.

One thing I am certain of is that I am a sinner. I struggle as a dad, husband, Christian and certainly as a pastor. I think a lot of folks struggle. I don’t live up to my own expectations, much less anyone else’s. The only thing that keeps me sane is a proper understanding of justification by faith through the finished work of Christ on the cross. Romans 5 changed my life.

I am not a very intelligent person, but I do have a quick wit of sorts and can express my thoughts in pithy ways. That’s not necessarily a good thing or a bad thing. That brings me to consider whether my parody account, “The Unappreciated Pastor,” is a good or a bad thing.

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The Problem of Hatred

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Ed.’s Note: One might expect a father to be pleased when one of his children does well. Surely, this father is. Below please find an essay written by Diana Miller Aldrich, who is a blogger, homemaker, wife, mother, and student pursing a Master of Arts in Public Policy, online.
Completing an assignment for her “Conflict and Communication” class, Diana wrote the essay below in response to the article: “Hatred’s End: A Christian Proposal to Peacemaking in a New Century, by John Dawson,” which is chapter 12 in the textbook, “Forgiveness and Reconciliation,” by Helmick and Petersen, Eds.

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There is a problem of hatred in the world today. Hatred exists because the world is comprised of human beings all given to the emotions of “envy, fear, and contention” (Helmick and Petersen, 2001, p. 234). Hatred often results from suffering some form of hurt and it is “impossible to have lived without being hurt” (Helmick and Petersen, 2001, p. 230). The church is not immune from hurting others and is itself often divided, something called “sectarian division” (Helmick and Petersen, 2001, p. 236). Hurts caused by Christians can hurt the most because individuals “anticipate Christ-like behavior” (Helmick and Petersen, 2001, p. 230) from other Christians.

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