Author Archive

Thursday is for Theological Terminology:
The Study of Specialized Words relating to Theology

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Thursday is for Theological Terminology:
The Study of Specialized Words relating to Theology

Ron F. Hale, Associate Pastor, West Jackson Baptist Church, Jackson, TN

Sola Scriptura

One definition: A Latin phrase meaning “scripture alone” and is one of the Five Solas that the early reformers used to show differences and distinctions between their teachings and those of the Roman Catholic Church.

On the Theopedia website, the following definition is given:

The inerrant Scripture (the Bible) is the sole source of written divine revelation, which alone can bind the conscience. The Bible alone teaches all that is necessary for our salvation from sin and is the standard by which all Christian behavior must be measured. It is denied that any creed, council or individual may bind a Christian’s conscience; that the Holy Spirit speaks independently of or contrary to what is set forth in the Bible, or that personal spiritual experience can ever be a vehicle of revelation.

A Catholic Point of View

Joel Peters shares an article on the Catholic website (www.Catholicapologetics.info) as he asks the question,” What is Sola Scriptura?”

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Preaching – Part 3

Dr. David L. Allen is Professor of Preaching, occupying the George W. Truett Chair of Ministry, Director of the Center for Expository Preaching, and Dean of the School of Theology at Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary.

This is the third article in Dr. Allen’s series on preaching. Read part 1 here and part 2 here.

In the great western movie “The Magnificent Seven” Chris (Yul Brynner) leads a band of seven hired guns to protect a Mexican village from marauders lead by Calvera (Eli Wallach). They train the villagers how to defend themselves. When Calvera and his 40 bandits ride into the village, they are met in the town square by Chris, who firmly tells Calvera: “ride on.” Calvera protests. “I’m going into the hills for the winter. Where am I going to get food for my men? Somehow, I don’t think you have solved my problem.” Chris replies: “Solving your problem is not our line.” At that point, the camera cuts to a lean, cool character standing a few feet to the right of Brynner – Steve McQueen. With a you-know-I-mean-business look and voice, he utters my favorite line in the movie: “We deal in lead, friend.” (Rent it; you won’t be disappointed.)

I am going to gloss Steve McQueen’s line and change one word in order to illustrate my topic in this third installment on preaching: “We deal in words, friend!” Preachers deal in words in three senses. First, we deal with the living Word of God, the Logos, our Lord Jesus Himself. Him we preach. Second, we deal with the Word of God written, the Scripture. This Word we preach. This written revelation consists in the very words of God. We believe in verbal, plenary inspiration. The Hebrew of the Old Testament and the Greek of the New Testament, like all languages, consist in vocabulary, grammar, syntax, and semantics. Through the painstaking process of exegesis, preachers ferret out the form and meaning of the text with an eye toward constructing sermons to communicate the Word(s) of God to people. God’s intents and purposes in giving us the Living and written Word provide the theological grounds for why we preach expositionally. Third, we deal in words to design and construct sermons to preach in order to explain God’s Word to people so that the Holy Spirit can accomplish His work in lives. Preaching is an oral/aural event that makes use of language to communicate. Preachers are wordsmiths. Thus, understanding language and how it is used; developing and honing our communication skills for the sake of preaching, is crucial.

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Preaching – Part 2

Dr. David L. Allen is Professor of Preaching, occupying the George W. Truett Chair of Ministry, Director of the Center for Expository Preaching, and Dean of the School of Theology at Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary.

This is the second article in Dr. Allen’s series on preaching. Read part 1 here.

If I were to personify preaching styles . . . in the not too distant past, tuxedo preaching, with its characteristic elegant and suave rhetoric and measured cadences, could still be heard in some places. In the 1980’s and 90’s, Tommy Hilfiger preaching, with its casual, open collar, boomer-targeted, “how to” sermonic style, was in vogue. With the dawn of the 21st century came tee shirt preaching, a younger, chasing cool, culturally relevant, hipster style. Tee shirt preaching spawned a smaller sub-genre: tank-top preaching; a gritty, in your face, no holds barred, crude, rude, and occasional profanity laced, preaching style. Each has its strengths and weaknesses, detractors and defenders, and each contains, to varying degrees, something worth emulating (crudity and cursing excepted, of course).

I am very much aware that this personification is something of a broad brush stroke and does not paint the homiletical portrait in its entirety. Many preachers are something of a combination of these or other styles, while others don’t really fit any of these categories. But what cannot be gainsaid is the fact that while yesterday’s preaching landscape was limited to a few homiletical prime colors, today’s canvas is spangled with colors more variegated than ever. And that is not necessarily a bad thing.

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Breaking News: Arlington Bible College Calls Ergun Caner as Provost and Vice President of Academic Affairs

The Arlington Baptist College announced a number of new initiatives at the annual World Baptist Fellowship meeting at the Texas campus today.

Upon the recommendation of President D.L. Moody, the Board of Directors voted unanimously to call Dr. Ergun Caner as Provost and Vice President of Academic Affairs. Along with his administrative duties, Caner will also teach Theology, Church History and Apologetics.

Founded by Dr. J. Frank Norris in 1939 as the Fundamental Bible Baptist Institute, the Arlington Baptist College is affiliated with the World Baptist Fellowship (WBF). In addition to Dr. Norris, the school has been led by such Baptist luminaries as Drs. Louis Entzminger, Earl K. Oldham, Wayne Martin and David Bryant. Dr. Moody was elected President in 2009.

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About SBC Today

From the editors of SBC Today:

Last week SBC Today published an article by Dr. Jerry Nash which expressed strong opinions about the future direction of the SBC. It voiced the view that the convention should recognize that the fault lines which divide us are essentially irreconcilable, and that the convention might be better served to divide into two groups that are more homogenous doctrinally. Some have expressed concerns about the appropriateness of SBC Today posting such an article, and questioned whether SBC Today endorsed the perspective voiced in the article.  These are valid and important questions, and deserve careful response and clarification.

To respond to the latter question first, it might be helpful to reiterate the strongdisclaimer published in “About SBC Today”:

“As with any blog, SBC Today attracts comments from a variety of perspectives. SBC Today does not necessarily endorse all that is said, not only in the comments but in the articles themselves. Sometimes articles may be included for interest and discussion, but we may not agree with everything that is said.”

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