Author Archive

Monday Sermon Workshop:
The Anatomy of Temptation (James 1:12-15)

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Monday Sermon Workshop:
The Anatomy of Temptation (James 1:12-15)

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By Craig Price, Associate Professor of New Testament and Greek,
occupying the Bob Hamblin Chair of New Testament Exposition, and
Associate Dean of Online Learning at New Orleans Baptist Theological Seminary

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This is the second of three step-by-step expositions by Dr. Price SBC is offering to assist pastors and other church leaders in developing sermon ideas or Bible studies for their ministries.  If you missed the first exposition on James 1:1-4, you can see it here: Joy in the Midst of Tribulation.

To see more expositions from James such as this, see Dr. Price’s workbook on James: Biblical Exegesis of New Testament Greek: James (Cascade Books, 2008).

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In this series of expositions, we are looking at small sections of text from the letter of James and performing “phrasing” exercises on the passages. William Mounce teaches the method of phrasing in his Graded Reader for Biblical Greek published by Zondervan. The phrasing technique also works well with English text. The interpreter may find Mounce’s same technique for English text in his Greek for the Rest of Us, also published by Zondervan.

The Text: James 1:12-15 (HSCB)

12 A man who endures trials is blessed, because when he passes the test he will receive the crown of life that God has promised to those who love Him. 13 No one undergoing a trial should say, “I am being tempted by God.” For God is not tempted by evil, and He Himself doesn’t tempt anyone. 14 But each person is tempted when he is drawn away and enticed by his own evil desires. 15 Then after desire has conceived, it gives birth to sin, and when sin is fully grown, it gives birth to death.

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A Journey to Forgiveness, Part 1

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By Dr. Jim Parker, Associate Professor of Biblical Interpretation and Associate Vice President for Facilities at New Orleans Baptist Theological Seminary

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C. S. Lewis once remarked that “Everyone thinks forgiveness is a lovely idea until they have someone to forgive. “  We always want to be forgiven when we are the offenders, but what about when we have received an offense or someone has hurt us?  We are never as quick to give forgiveness as we are to want it.

Some determine the speed with which forgiveness is given or the depth of the forgiveness extended based on the perceived severity of the offense. The severity of the offense is usually based on the consequential damage of the offense.  For instance, it is easier, we feel, to forgive someone for stealing $20 from us than someone who has perhaps murdered a family member.  Based on the severity of consequences then, we feel we are able to delay forgiveness until such a time as we deem is appropriate or in some cases (I fear many cases) we withhold it altogether.  This just seems like the right thing to do, doesn’t it?

In 1998 a professing Christian man that was performing a professional service for me literally stole hundreds of thousands of dollars from me.  At first I was in denial about it and believed that this man would not really do this to me, a friend, a brother in Christ.  Soon it became apparent that he had done it and was doing everything he could to avoid me and my attempts to get my money back.  Weeks turned to months and months to years.  I was forced to go through the processes of law to try and recover my money, paying out even more money to a legal system that ultimately failed to help me. I never got one dime of the money that was stolen.  If anyone ever had a reason to withhold forgiveness,  certainly it was me and surely these circumstances dictated that I do so.   Don’t you think so?

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The Top Blog Posts of the Week

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This is a list of recent blog posts which we found interesting.  That we found them interesting doesn’t mean we necessarily agree with or endorse the ideas presented in the posts, but that we found them to be intriguing and thought-provoking.  (They are listed in no particular order of interest). Please post your comments to discuss  any article that strikes your interest. If you have recent blog posts to nominate, please send the link to admin@sbctoday.com.
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About the SBC

Southern Baptists, Immigration, and Ducks,” by Howell Scott on the From Law to Grace blog, expressing concern about the resolution on immigration approved by the SBC Phoenix.

Deporting Compassion, the Gospel, and Illegals,” by Andrew Wencl on the SBC Impact blog, with further commentary on the SBC Phoenix resolution on immigration.

Al Mohler, Homosexuality, and Continued Moral Confusion, Part 1 and Part 2,” by Peter Lumpkins, with further reflection on Dr. Mohler’s comments about homosexuality at and after the SBC convention in Phoenix.

Help Me Understand, Dr. Mohler,” by Tim Rogers at the Southern Baptist in North Carolina blog, with further conversation about Dr. Mohler’s comments about homosexuality.

Mohler on Homosexuality: Read and Comprehend,” by Matt Svoboda on the SBC Voices blog, with further conversation about Dr. Mohler’s comments about homosexuality.

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Theological Vocabulary Thursday
Libertarian Free Will: Jesus’ Reaction to Jerusalem’s Rejection Reflects the Father’s Reaction

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Theological Vocabulary Thursday
Libertarian Free Will: Jesus’ Reaction to Jerusalem’s Rejection Reflects the Father’s Reaction

By L. Manning Garrett III, Ph.D., Pastor, East Laurel Baptist Church, Jackson, TN

Regarding last week’s article, “Two Versions of Free Will in Southern Baptist Life,” there were several comments pertaining to my reference to Jesus’ reaction to Jerusalem’s rejection of Him in Matthew 23: 37-39 and Luke 13:34-35. One respondent observed that it is not clear why nonCalvinists think this episode in Jesus’ life counts against Calvinism. I will show why I think this text supports the idea that Jesus believed that the Jerusalemites had libertarian free will — they rejected Him but could have accepted Him.

Calvinist compatibilists will argue that the Jerusalemites are responsible for rejecting Jesus because they were acting on their deepest desire: they wanted to reject Jesus. Further they will argue that the Jerusalemites “could not have accepted Jesus,” while libertarians claim that the Jerusalemites had the real option to accept Jesus but chose to reject Him. NonCalvinist libertarians and Calvinist compatibilists differ with respect to whether or not the Jerusalemites had the real option “to desire to accept Jesus.”

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Monday Sermon Workshop:
Joy in the Midst of Tribulation (James 1:1-4)

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Monday Sermon Workshop:
Joy in the Midst of Tribulation (James 1:1-4)

By Craig Price, Associate Professor of New Testament and Greek, occupying the Bob Hamblin Chair of New Testament Exposition, and Associate Dean of Online Learning at New Orleans Baptist Theological Seminary
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SBC Today will offer three step-by-step expositions by Dr. Price to assist pastors and other church leaders in developing sermon ideas or Bible studies for their ministries.

Reasons to Be Joyful in the Middle of Trials (James 1:1-4)

The little book of James has been one of the most encouraging letters in the New Testament for believers going through trials and tribulations. In this series of lessons, we will examine the letter from a different perspective. We will use William Mounce’s technique of “phrasing” in order to derive the outline for the text. These lessons will serve more as “starter” lessons for busy pastors and teachers to get a jump-start on the upcoming sermon or lesson.

The Text: James 1:1-4 (HSCB)

1 James, a slave of God and of the Lord Jesus Christ: To the twelve tribes in the Dispersion. Greetings. 2 Consider it a great joy, my brothers, whenever you experience various trials, 3 knowing that the testing of your faith produces endurance. 4 But endurance must do its complete work, so that you may be mature and complete, lacking nothing.

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