Author Archive

GW Truett on Infant Baptism (big B)

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George W. Truett on infant baptism as part of his Baptists and Religious Liberty speech on the steps of the National Capitol on Sunday, May 16, 1920 (in conjunction with the Southern Baptist Convention held in D.C.)

INFANT BAPTISM UNTHINKABLE

It follows, inevitably, that Baptists are unalterably opposed to every form of sponsorial religion. If I have fellow Christians in this presence today who are the protagonists of infant baptism, they will allow me to say frankly, and certainly I would say it in the most fraternal, Christian spirit, that to Baptists infant baptism is unthinkable from every viewpoint. First of all, Baptists do not find the slightest sanction for infant baptism in the Word of God. That fact, to Baptists, makes infant baptism a most serious question for the consideration of the whole Christian world. Nor is that all. As Baptists see it, infant baptism tends to ritualize Christianity and reduce it to lifeless forms. It tends also and inevitably, as Baptists see it, to secularizing of the church and to the blurring and blotting out of the line of demarcation between the church and the unsaved world.

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Seeker + Sinner’s Prayer = Salvation in LW Store

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by Bob Smietana*

AMARILLO, Texas (BP)– Victoria Cano was getting ready to close the LifeWay Christian store one Saturday in Amarillo, Texas, when she noticed a woman entering the doors.

As is her custom, Victoria asked the woman if she needed any help.

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What’s Your True Identity? / Steven Rummage, PhD

Steven Rummage

A duckling hatched from its egg in a nest underneath the front porch of a farmhouse.  And for whatever reason, that duckling’s mother was no longer around. So when that duckling came out of its shell, the first thing it saw was the Collie dog that took its nap every afternoon underneath that porch.

Ducks have a tendency to bond with the first thing they see when they’re hatched out of the egg. And so when that duckling came out of its egg and saw the Collie dog there, it just assumed that that dog was its mother, and that it, too, must be a dog.

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Monopoly® & the Kingdom of God / Walker Moore

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by Walker Moore
Founder/President
Awe Star Ministries

I don’t know Jesus’ exact position on the popular board game, Monopoly®, but I’m pretty sure He wouldn’t like it. And there are several reasons I don’t like it either. I don’t know if it’s because of my dyslexia or what, but I hate counting stacks of money. It may be because I’ve served in countries where the exchange rate is astronomical. In Zimbabwe not long ago, one U.S. dollar would equal 642,371,437,695,221,000 Zimbabwean dollars. Or in simpler terms, one egg would have cost 35 million Zimbabwean dollars. I would have just handed the clerk a stack of money and said, “You count it out.”

I don’t know if there’s anyone else like me out there, but I’m a terrible money counter. You can put a stack of dollar bills in front of me, ask me to count them five times, and I’ll come up with five different answers. I am always amazed by people who work at banks and can buzz through a stack of money in the blink of an eye, always coming up with the correct amount.

It seems to me that Monopoly brings out our worst. I know it’s just a game, and some people like to use strategy. But have you noticed there’s not much difference between their strategy and greed? Play this game with some of the sweetest people you know, and they transform into monsters right before your eyes. They’re out to buy everything on the board and run you into bankruptcy. Forget mercy, good will or kindness. It’s all about the win.

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Hypocrisy / Steven Rummage, PhD

Steven Rummage

by Dr. Steven Rummage, pastor
Bell Shoals Baptist Church
Brandon, Fla.

It happened years ago in a small community up in Massachusetts. It was one of those neighborhoods where everybody keeps track of each other and looks out for their neighbors. Everybody knows what’s going on with the folks across the street and those next door to them.

The people in this community became alarmed when Adele Gaboury, an elderly lady in the community seemed to be missing. They didn’t see her anymore. In the morning, she wasn’t out walking like she used to, and she didn’t go and get the newspaper like she used to in the afternoon, and so they began to wonder if something was wrong.

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