Author Archive

Management for Ministers & Missionaries / Walker Moore

Walker Moore - book

by Walker Moore
founder, president of AweStar Ministries

Walker Moore has for decades trained and led thousands of teens on international missions trips, thus changing their lives as disciples and changing the eternities for others who became disciples as a result.
Walker is gifted by God in preaching and leadership. Having spoken at state Baptist conventions, local associations, major churches and missions conferences across the SBC, he remains an influential voice for missions among pastors, church staff and members, and teens.
To book Walker as a speaker in your church or conference, click HERE.

 

As I write this article, I’m sitting in a McDonald’s on Interstate 35 in Ardmore. I don’t ever remember writing an article from a fast food restaurant before. To be honest, I’m not sure it is all that fast or even if it is really food. But I owe it to the Golden Arches to eat here every so often. They’ve fed thousands of my students as our youth groups traveled across the country. In the beginning, they lured me in by offering free meals for youth pastors. Now, they lure me in by offering free Wi-Fi.  I wonder what they’ll offer when I move into the next phase of my life: a free EKG?

As a youth pastor, I was always attracted to the concept of free.  At least when I turned in the receipts to the chairman of the finance committee, I didn’t have to explain why I supersized my order. For some reason, the people who controlled the money kept sending me books about fasting.  But I’m not with a church group today, so I had to pay for my meal.

I’ve also been working on the leadership training manual for our ministry. Awe Star’s effectiveness depends on the principles and skills we instill in our leaders, who are preparing to take teams to Ethiopia, Mexico, Panama, Peru and Venezuela. Their training includes medical emergencies; safety; evacuating a team from a country; and dealing with spiritual, mental and emotional problems.  We pour hours and hours into these young men and women. And guess what happens after they finish leading a team? They must go back through the entire training process the next year. We can’t rely on last year’s training. We must remind them of what they already know and keep pouring into them new principles and skills as God directs.

Jesus spent lots of time pouring His life into those who became the first leaders of the church, too. After all my years of training leaders, I’ve boiled the process down into three areas: people, time and money. If you, like Jesus, can master these, you’ll  be an effective leader. And these are the same three areas in which you need to train your children.

You see, Awe Star not only trains students to be leaders but equips students for life. I can’t begin to tell you how many people I know who have had to leave the ministry because they didn’t know how to manage one of these three things. I know pastors who are great preachers but don’t know how to get along with people, and they move from church to church. Others are weak in the area of financial stewardship and get into budget problems. Still others don’t know how to manage their time, and their ineffectiveness turns their ministry into a joke.

Your leadership will only rise to your lowest standard in any of these areas.  If you don’t master them, they’ll master you. So if you want to become more proficient, study how Jesus functioned within these realms.

1. People: Wise leaders are good stewards of human resources, understanding  how to cast vision and use individuals’ giftedness to accomplish a bigger purpose. Jesus could walk up to two fishermen and say, “Follow Me,” and immediately they dropped their nets and followed Him (Matt. 4:19-20).  He could give a woman at a well His undivided attention, and the next moment, overturn the money tables in protest of those who were making a mockery of God’s House.  Jesus was a master of people.

2. Time: I hear students say things like, “when I get out of college, I’ll have more time.” No, they won’t. They’ll still have a 24-hour day and a seven-day week.  No one was busier than Jesus:  “Jesus did many other things as well. If every one of them were written down, I suppose that even the whole world would not have room for the books that would be written” (John 21:25). But He knew how to prioritize His time and understood the importance of spending time with His Father. Jesus was a master of time.

3. Money: Jesus taught us the proper place of wealth in a believer’s life. He taught us in what order we are to use our money and often spoke about financial responsibility. He showed us, above all, that our attitude about money is more important than how much or little we have. Jesus was a master of money.

As I watch the people coming into McDonald’s this morning, I see the pain in their lives. I hear them yelling at each other and watch them spending money that should go toward other things. What they really need is not a Value Meal but a life of value. And that only comes from knowing Him.

 

Historical Southern Baptist Soteriology, pt. 3/3

EmirCaner

What Were the Early SBC Leaders’ View of Salvation?
by Emir Caner, Ph.D.
President, Truett-McConnell College
Cleveland, Ga.

(Read part 1, HERE.)
(Read part 2, HERE.)
(Download this essay and all the other theological presentations presented at the 2013 John 3.16 Conference, HERE.)

A closer look into Baptist history demonstrates that Baptists perpetually struggled with theological complexities, especially that of Calvinism. But by the beginning of the Southern Baptist Convention, the stage was set for diversity among the people who would be called Southern Baptists. In terms of Reformed doctrine of salvation, it was acceptable to question all of the classical points of Calvinism with one exception – eternal security. And while Baptists agreed with our Reformed brethren on the basic definition, the intricacies of even this doctrine were debated. Thus, Southern Baptists did not move away from Calvinism due to the experiential viewpoint of Southern Seminary president E. Y. Mullins at the beginning of the twentieth century. As Baptists matured in their faith, they had questioned, rejected, or redefined much of Calvinistic doctrine since the pinnacle of Calvinism in the mid-eighteenth century. They sought and demanded a simple faith, one based in their hope for revival.

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A Penny for Wiersbe? Yes!

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“Jesus in the Present Tense: The I AM Statements of Christ”
by Warren Wiersbe

Click HERE to buy the e-version of this book for only a penny.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

From chapter 1:

 

Historical Southern Baptist Soteriology, pt. 2/3

EmirCaner

What Were the Early SBC Leaders’ View of Salvation?
by Emir Caner, Ph.D.
President, Truett-McConnell College
Cleveland, Ga.

(Read part 1, HERE.)
(Download this essay and all the other theological presentations presented at the 2013 John 3.16 Conference, HERE.)

Transition and Tumult (1820-1845): A Gospel Worthy of All Acceptation

At the turn of the century, two movements arose that both tempered Calvinism as well as flamed the fires of evangelism: the rise of the modern missionary movement and the unification of the Regular and Separate Baptists. First, the modern missionary movement was born out of the hearts of Particular Baptists William Carey and Andrew Fuller. The later published his work, The Gospel Worthy of All Acceptation, in 1786, transitioning English Calvinism into a more missiological model. That was especially the case in 1801 when Fuller, after debating with a General Baptist, revised his book, proclaiming a general atonement and indefinite invitations. He writes:

If the atonement of Christ were considered as the literal payment of a debt – if the measure of his sufferings were according to the number of those for whom he died, and to the degree of their guilt…it might be inconsistent with the indefinite invitations…But it would be equally inconsistent with the free forgiveness of sin, and with sinners being directed to apply for mercy as supplicants, rather than as claimants….If the atonement of Christ excludes a part of mankind in the same sense as it excludes fallen angels, why is the gospel addressed to the one any more than the other? The message of wisdom is addressed to men, and not to devils. The former are invited to the gospel supper, but the latter are not. These facts afford proof that Christ, by his death, opened a door of hope to sinners of the human race as sinners; affording a ground for their being invited, without distinction, to believe and be saved.116

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Historical Southern Baptist Soteriology, pt. 1/3

EmirCaner

What Were the Early SBC Leaders’ View of Salvation?
by Emir Caner, Ph.D.
President, Truett-McConnell College
Cleveland, Ga.

(Download this essay and all the other theological presentations presented at the 2013 John 3.16 Conference, HERE.)

Revival Fires

Unforgettable. Such is the description of the first time I walked into a Southern Baptist church. On a cool fall evening in the early 1980s, I was invited to the Stelzer Road Baptist Church in Columbus, Ohio, for their biannual revival. The evangelist for the protracted, week-long meeting was a country preacher from the mountains of Kentucky whose preaching and demeanor were typical of the time. A blend of thunderous passion with simple exposition, Brother Joe, as he was called, heralded an intensely personal message pointed directly at me. He seemed a bit eccentric to me at the time, especially by his attire. Driving an old green car that resembled a boat more than an automobile, Brother Joe filled the back seat of his vehicle with suits he would wear as the circuit-riding evangelist crisscrossed the country hundreds of days a year. But one thing remained the same – he always wore red socks representing the blood of Jesus.

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