Author Archive

About Baptizing Children | Dr. Tim Barnette

Tim_Barnette

Of Baptisms and Children

by Dr. Tim Barnette, pastor
Oakdale Baptist Church
Rocky Mount, N. Car.

 

“Let the little children come to Me, and don’t stop them, because the kingdom of God belongs to such as these. I assure you: Whoever does not welcome the kingdom of God like a little child will never enter it.” – Jesus in Luke 18.16-17 (HCSB)

The Pastors’ Task Force on SBC Evangelistic Impact & Declining Baptisms released the findings of its research just before the 2014 Southern Baptist Convention in Baltimore, MD. Among other things, they noted “The only consistently growing age group in baptisms is age five and under.” While I believe the report offers valuable insights that can and should be used to spur greater evangelistic effort on the part of Southern Baptists, I am somewhat troubled by the response that particular line has received.

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Young, Settled, and Traditional | Rev. Allen Rea

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by Allen Michael Rea, pastor
Dunn Memorial Baptist Church
Baxley, Ga.

I am young (29 to be exact), have two beautiful daughters and one on the way, and have been married almost eight years to Kara, my beautiful wife. We met at Brewton-Parker College, a wonderful Georgia Baptist college in southeast Georgia. All of these eight years have been spent in service to the local church.

My days are a little chaotic because Kara and I are humble homeschoolers. I also am serving my first full time church while pursuing a D.Min. degree.

Thankfully, I have gotten a little experience behind me. I was blessed to preach my first sermon at age 12, and I was licensed to preach at 16. In those early years of pulpit supply, I had only a Bible. I was borrowing commentaries left and right; however, I came across a little orange book, “What Baptists Believe,” by Herschel H. Hobbs.

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Children come to Christ at VBS

Now it's your turn to tell the world what God is doing in your church.

Submitted by
Jonathan Carter, pastor
Mt. Zion Baptist Church
Monticello, Ky.

Jonathan Carter

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A Day Is a Day Is a Day of Course: Unless That Day Challenges Darwinism!

Ronnie Rogers is senior pastor of Trinity Baptist Church in Norman, Okla.

by Ronnie Rogers, pastor
Trinity Baptist Church
Norman, Okla.

 

This is the second part of this series of articles, which looks at the strengths of interpreting the word “day” in Genesis chapter 1 as a normal lunar day. The fourth and final article answers objections to this normal reading of the text. See my post under the same title, Part I published 6/4/14.
5      Genesis 1 pattern: the first day is called “one day” (“day one”); the others say “first day,” “second day,” and day two through five also lack a definite article; then days six and seven have an article before the numbers. Consequently chapter 1 reads like this: day one, a second day, a third day, a fourth day, a fifth day, the sixth day, and the seventh day.

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Is Day-Age View of Genesis Synonymous w/Evolution?

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by Nina Street Dunton

Ed.’s note: The author of this blog post took exception to the post of a few weeks ago by Pastor Ronnie Rogers titled “A Day Is a Day Is a Day of Course: Unless That Day Challenges Evolution!
SBCToday asked Nina Dunton to write a response, which is below. And below that is a response from Pastor Rogers to this post. Pastor Rogers’ 2nd of this multi-part series will be posted on Wednesday.

Nina Street Dunton is a lay member of North Glencoe Baptist Church in Glencoe, Alabama. She has studied Christian apologetics for 18 years and holds a certificate in CA from Biola University, a bachelor’s degree in visual arts from Auburn University, and is a member of the board of directors of the Christian ministry Reasons To Believe.
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The first time I became aware that there was confusion about the day-age view was at a speaker’s workshop in Georgia a few years ago. I was in conversation with a young Institute for Creation Research apologist who, after finding out I held this view, said, “So you believe in evolution?”

I scrunched up my nose and said, “No,” rather emphatically. In hindsight, I wish I had followed up on his reasoning that someone who held an old-earth view must necessarily believe in evolution—for they are two very different ideas.

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