Author Archive

Historical Southern Baptist Soteriology, pt. 3/3

EmirCaner

What Were the Early SBC Leaders’ View of Salvation?
by Emir Caner, Ph.D.
President, Truett-McConnell College
Cleveland, Ga.

(Read part 1, HERE.)
(Read part 2, HERE.)
(Download this essay and all the other theological presentations presented at the 2013 John 3.16 Conference, HERE.)

A closer look into Baptist history demonstrates that Baptists perpetually struggled with theological complexities, especially that of Calvinism. But by the beginning of the Southern Baptist Convention, the stage was set for diversity among the people who would be called Southern Baptists. In terms of Reformed doctrine of salvation, it was acceptable to question all of the classical points of Calvinism with one exception – eternal security. And while Baptists agreed with our Reformed brethren on the basic definition, the intricacies of even this doctrine were debated. Thus, Southern Baptists did not move away from Calvinism due to the experiential viewpoint of Southern Seminary president E. Y. Mullins at the beginning of the twentieth century. As Baptists matured in their faith, they had questioned, rejected, or redefined much of Calvinistic doctrine since the pinnacle of Calvinism in the mid-eighteenth century. They sought and demanded a simple faith, one based in their hope for revival.

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A Penny for Wiersbe? Yes!

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“Jesus in the Present Tense: The I AM Statements of Christ”
by Warren Wiersbe

Click HERE to buy the e-version of this book for only a penny.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

From chapter 1:

 

Historical Southern Baptist Soteriology, pt. 2/3

EmirCaner

What Were the Early SBC Leaders’ View of Salvation?
by Emir Caner, Ph.D.
President, Truett-McConnell College
Cleveland, Ga.

(Read part 1, HERE.)
(Download this essay and all the other theological presentations presented at the 2013 John 3.16 Conference, HERE.)

Transition and Tumult (1820-1845): A Gospel Worthy of All Acceptation

At the turn of the century, two movements arose that both tempered Calvinism as well as flamed the fires of evangelism: the rise of the modern missionary movement and the unification of the Regular and Separate Baptists. First, the modern missionary movement was born out of the hearts of Particular Baptists William Carey and Andrew Fuller. The later published his work, The Gospel Worthy of All Acceptation, in 1786, transitioning English Calvinism into a more missiological model. That was especially the case in 1801 when Fuller, after debating with a General Baptist, revised his book, proclaiming a general atonement and indefinite invitations. He writes:

If the atonement of Christ were considered as the literal payment of a debt – if the measure of his sufferings were according to the number of those for whom he died, and to the degree of their guilt…it might be inconsistent with the indefinite invitations…But it would be equally inconsistent with the free forgiveness of sin, and with sinners being directed to apply for mercy as supplicants, rather than as claimants….If the atonement of Christ excludes a part of mankind in the same sense as it excludes fallen angels, why is the gospel addressed to the one any more than the other? The message of wisdom is addressed to men, and not to devils. The former are invited to the gospel supper, but the latter are not. These facts afford proof that Christ, by his death, opened a door of hope to sinners of the human race as sinners; affording a ground for their being invited, without distinction, to believe and be saved.116

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Historical Southern Baptist Soteriology, pt. 1/3

EmirCaner

What Were the Early SBC Leaders’ View of Salvation?
by Emir Caner, Ph.D.
President, Truett-McConnell College
Cleveland, Ga.

(Download this essay and all the other theological presentations presented at the 2013 John 3.16 Conference, HERE.)

Revival Fires

Unforgettable. Such is the description of the first time I walked into a Southern Baptist church. On a cool fall evening in the early 1980s, I was invited to the Stelzer Road Baptist Church in Columbus, Ohio, for their biannual revival. The evangelist for the protracted, week-long meeting was a country preacher from the mountains of Kentucky whose preaching and demeanor were typical of the time. A blend of thunderous passion with simple exposition, Brother Joe, as he was called, heralded an intensely personal message pointed directly at me. He seemed a bit eccentric to me at the time, especially by his attire. Driving an old green car that resembled a boat more than an automobile, Brother Joe filled the back seat of his vehicle with suits he would wear as the circuit-riding evangelist crisscrossed the country hundreds of days a year. But one thing remained the same – he always wore red socks representing the blood of Jesus.

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The Risen Savior / W.A. Criswell

WACriswell
Text: Romans 1.4
Preached: 3.30.75

On the radio and on television you are sharing with us the services of the First Baptist Church in Dallas.  This is the pastor, bringing the message entitled Declared to be the Son of God by the Resurrection from the Dead, by the Spirit of Holiness, and by the Power of God: The Risen Savior.In the first chapter of Romans, beginning at the first verse:

Paul, a servant of Jesus Christ, a called apostle, separated unto the gospel of God, (Which He had promised afore by His prophets in the holy Scriptures,) Concerning his Son Jesus Christ, our Lord, who was made of the seed of David according to the flesh; And declared to be the Son of God with power, according to the Spirit of holiness, by the resurrection from the dead.

Romans1:1-4

 Horizo, an unusual word, translated here, “Declared to be the Son of God with power, according to the Spirit of holiness, by the resurrection from the dead.”  Horizo, “marked out,” our word “horizon” comes from it.  That is the line of the earth that is marked out against the sky—the horizon, horizo.  “Marked out” to be the Son of God in power, in holiness, and in resurrection.

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